Yahoo Weather

You are here

Elma High students plant trout in ponds

Elma High School environmental biology student Tristen Beerbower transfers trout from the EHS environmental greenhouse to Vance Creek Ponds as a cooperative project with the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife and the EHS Career & Technical Environmental Science program.
Elma High School environmental biology student Tristen Beerbower transfers trout from the EHS environmental greenhouse to Vance Creek Ponds as a cooperative project with the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife and the EHS Career & Technical Environmental Science program.
Elma High School photo EHS students Tristen Beerbower, Walker Reeve and Michael Warne net the trout from the EHS environmental greenhouse tank to transfer to the Elma Ponds.
Elma High School photo EHS students Tristen Beerbower, Walker Reeve and Michael Warne net the trout from the EHS environmental greenhouse tank to transfer to the Elma Ponds.

Elma High School students planted trout at the Elma Ponds at Vance Creek Park in January. This is a cooperative program between the Department of Fish & Wildlife and the Elma Career & Technical Environment Science program at the school.

Teens are provided first-hand experience in applying classroom instruction to a real-world setting in the EHS natural resources greenhouse. Students in Tyler Renz’s environmental biology class are afforded a unique opportunity not found in many traditional biology classes — fish. These students are responsible for raising 1,000 rainbow trout to be planted in the Elma Ponds each year. Additionally, Coho salmon are raised and released along with propagating Northwest native plants for riparian restoration.

“Raising and releasing fish is necessary to maintain their population. I am glad to be a part of enhancing our environment,” said Riley Mowry, a forestry technology student.

Environmental biology and forestry technology students use technology to test water quality and growth rates. This experience provides them opportunities to develop career skills, including time management and the ability to solve problems by unconventional means.

“This project is a large responsibility that requires students coming in on the weekends and school breaks to clean tanks, test water, feed fish and manage other problems that may have arisen over the previous 24 hours,” stated Renz. “These students have done a great job and should be proud of their success.”

Close
The Vidette website is available only to print and digital subscribers. If you are already a subscriber, you can access the website at no additional charge.